LiveBindings – what do you expect?

Since the start of the RAD Studio XE2 World Tour the word is out. Delphi XE2 will have 64-bit compiler, support for OSX and iOS applications with their new FireMonkey GUI framework and LiveBindings. If you haven't read the detailed RAD STUDIO XE2: Launch Event Report yet - now is the time to do it.When I heared about some built-in data binding architecture for the first time I was very excited. It was just a headword on the roadmap for Project "Wheelhouse" but now we know it will be coming with XE2!Unfortunately there have been much more informations and speculations about the 64-bit compiler, the support for other operating systems and the FireMonkey framework than for those LiveBindings.On the official Embarcadero forums there has been some discussion about what to expect. WPF and Cocoa have been mentioned. It has also been mentioned in Auckland that there will be some expression engine to do more than just simply add the TCustomer.LastName property to some TEdit.Text but use some kind of scripting. How will this work? Will there be some designtime support for it to make sure you don't have typos in it (one of the major drawbacks in my current implementation)? Also will the whole binding architecture be supported by new language features to make it save at compile time (like property references or built-in change notifications)?Lots of questions but only few informations (yet). But we can guess, speculate and wish. So please feel free and leave a comment about what you expect from LiveBindings in Delphi XE2.
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Delphi for iOS!

I attended the Rad Studio World Tour today in Auckland. Delphi XE2 has some nice features (x64, OSX, FireMonkey) but the standout for me was the iOS support.Developing for the iPhone et al is mostly a pain in the proverbial. XCode is somewhat of a mess and Objective C was designed by someone with an unholy fetish for square brackets. The last time I did iPhone dev, I did most of my coding in c++ on Windows and only booted into OSX for deployment and testing on the iPhone.Embarcadero are looking to fix that with Delphi XE2. You can write and test your code in Delphi on Windows. When you need to try it on iOS, you create a xcode project (1 mouse click, only needed once) and then boot into OSX and open the xcode project there. From xcode you can edit, compile, run and debug your 100% Delphi code. If you have either Windows or OSX in a virtual machine you can flick from one tother as you wish. Yor app can be compiled and run in both Windows and iOS.Awesome!It's not all perfect, xcode is still there, OSX is a must and the whole code signing is probably as irritating as before, but it's much better than the objective c alternative. It only works with new apps written using FireMonkey but you will be able to pull in older code.The iOS app is full native code, with access to hardware such as gps, accelerometer and camera.Note: Accessing the phone hardware means that your app will no longer run under windows due to either the hardware or the support units not being there. I suspect that this is resolvable with some conditional defines and a bit of hacking.Much to my supprise I am now excited again; both about delphi programming and about iOS programming.
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Delivering software continuously and why you should

I’ve recently really been getting into a Software Delivery methodology which for me, wraps up a selection of the most potent benefits of Agile, TDD, Continuous Integration which requires Development and Operations to work very closely. Holy cow, all those flashy words in a single description, that must mean this is some enterprisey buzzwordy new […] … Read More

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June 17 2011: Software Development Network Event, The Netherlands

On Friday June 17, 2011, the next SDN event will take place in the Achmea Eureko Conference Center in Ziest, The Netherlands will take place, with a full Delphi track consisting of 5 sessions by speakers Brian Long (2), Olivier Olmer, Filip Demuynck, and Bob Swart. Brian Long will talk about Programming for Android with Delphi Prism and Mono for Android, as well as Project Cooper, which brings native Android programming to Delphi developers.
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Developer Issue Report Tool (DIRT) Client screenshots

People who've attended the Delphi XE DataSnap webinar, or read the Delphi XE in Action white paper on "DataSnap XE in the Real World" may have seen the development bits of my Developer Issue Report Tool (DIRT) Server and Client, but here are some screenshots of the most recent build. After you login to the DIRT DataSnap Client (called DirtCleaner by the way), you will get an overview of all issues that belong to you (either because you were the Reporter or the Assigned-To user).
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Delphi XE DataSnap Development courseware and webinar

Within the next 24 hours, I will send out the third edition of the Delphi XE DataSnap Development Courseware manual to all current registered buyers from http://www.eBob42.com/courseware, at 190 pages - now also available as paperback from Lulu.com without updates to the paperback, I'm afraid. The paperback edition of the Delphi XE DataSnap Development courseware manual contains 190 pages, with sections about: DataSnap History and Example Data, DataSnap Server Targets (and Wizards), DataSnap Security, DataSnap Server Components, DataSnap Server Deployment, DataSnap Clients, DataSnap and Databases, DBX: DataSnap Filters, DataSnap REST and Callbacks, DataSnap and .NET Clients, and an appendix about the extended Developer Issue Report Tool (DIRT) Server and Client.
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